The Contemporary New England Witch

The Contemporary New England Witch
Ms Faith

Wednesday, May 30, 2012

More magick of plants, herbs and flowers! Bleeding heart, Carnation & Foxglove

Good Evening,

Tonight we are discussing, again, some of the special magicks of plants, herbs and flowers. The plants we will discuss are common enough plants found in many gardens; Bleeding heart, Carnation and Foxglove.


The Bleeding Heart plant has many blossoms that look like little heart charms dangling off a charm bracelet. It has been a popular flower since Victorian times and has the magickal reputation to bring love into ones life. It is in sync with the planet Venus and the element of water. There is a superstition that if grown indoors it will bring about negative energies, but this can be changed by burying a coin in the soil around the base of the plant.


The Carnation is also a plant that has been used for centuries and during William Shakespeare's time it had been called many things from pinks, scaffold flowers, sops-in-wine, to gilliflowers. Also known as Dianthus it has the magickal properties of protection, strength and healing. It is in sync with the planet Sun and the element of fire.

During ancient times the carnation was worn to protect one from coming to an untimely death on the scaffold! Today the protective qualities of the flower are still employed by one bringing carnations to a hospital bed-ridden patient to bring about strength, healing and to protect them from getting sicker and possibly dying. If using for healing purposes use the red variety of carnation. They may be placed on the altar during healing spells and the dried blossoms can be placed in healing spell kits and in sachets.



Now for foxglove, a popular garden plant in Victorian times as well as now. Foxglove grows wild in wooded areas and along the edges of meadows and is said to attract the fairies. It is host to a number of interesting folk-names such as Deadmen's Bells, Fairy Petticoats, Fairy Thimbles, The Great Herb, Witches bells, and Witches Thimbles. Foxglove is also known as Digitalis and is used in pharmacopeia for medicines designed to aid the heart. Foxglove is very poisonous and should never be taken unless administered by a trained medical doctor and NEVER should one self administer the herb as IT WILL KILL YOU!!!

The magickal properties of foxglove are protection and the repelling of evil energies. The plant syncs up with the planet Venus and again the element of water. When grown in the garden the plant protects the garden as well as the home. Never bring foxglove inside as that angers the fairies and your good luck will run a muck! Housewives in Wales will take the leaves of foxglove and make a black ink out of them and then use this ink to paint black crossed lines on their cottages stone floors to keep evil from entering.

Again, remember that foxglove is never to be taken internally as it is quite poisonous. This plant is a bi-annual plant that puts out its leaves the first year, the tall stalks with blossoms the second year and then dies away. You can keep your foxglove in your garden by being sure to shake the stalks when they set seeds so the seeds fall to the ground and grow the next year. If you do this every year you will always have the lucky, protective foxglove in your garden!!



Now, this witch is about to sit a spell in her garden and ponder on the many magickal qualities of the rest of her plants, herbs and flowers. I hope you liked this little series of the magick of plants, herbs and flowers as much as I've enjoyed discussing them with you!


Peace and Happiness


Tonight's discussion gets much of its magickal information from:

Mr. Scott Cunningham's - "Cunningham's Encyclopedia of Magical Herbs"



© 2010-2012 Faith M. McCann. Portions of this blog posting may include materials from my book “Enchantments School for the Magickal Arts First Year Magickal Studies.” For more information, see www.enchantmentsschool.com or go to the title of tonight's discussion and click, it will link you to my school's website. Please note that the copying and/or further distribution of this work without express written permission is prohibited.



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2 comments:

  1. I love foxglove - It also attracts hummingbirds! It was interesting to see the victorian aspect too - maybe that's why these flowers grow well on our property.

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  2. Very interesting info. Thanks!

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